The Reformed Husband-Man; or A Brief Treatise of the Errors, Defects, and Inconveniences of our English Husbandry, in ploughing and sowing for Corn; with the Reasons and general Remedies; and a large, yet faithful Offer or Undertaking for the benefit of them that will joyn in this good and publick Work. Imparted some years ago to Mr. Samuel Hartlib; and now by him re-imparted to all ingenuous English-men, that are willing to advance the Prosperity, Wealth and Plenty of their Native Countrey. Samuel HARTLIB, ed., possible author, Cressy or DYMOCK, author.

The Reformed Husband-Man

The Reformed Husband-Man; or A Brief Treatise of the Errors, Defects, and Inconveniences of our English Husbandry, in ploughing and sowing for Corn; with the Reasons and general Remedies; and a large, yet faithful Offer or Undertaking for the benefit of them that will joyn in this good and publick Work. Imparted some years ago to Mr. Samuel Hartlib; and now by him re-imparted to all ingenuous English-men, that are willing to advance the Prosperity, Wealth and Plenty of their Native Countrey.

Title within typographical border (shaved at foot). 2 p.l., 14 pp., one blank leaf. Small 4to, attractive antique panelled calf (some shaving to bottom line or catchwords on several pages), spine gilt, red morocco lettering piece on spine. London: Printed by J.C., 1651.

First edition. “The Reformed Husbandman…is sometimes attributed to Speed, although it was probably written by Cressy Dymock…It is a pamphlet of some 16 pages and full of moral reflections, a melodious exhortation to industry.”–Fussell, I, p. 45.

“The most visible impact of Hartlib’s circle lay in the numerous pamphlets that he published…They comprised letters and treatises solicited or received from individuals in his circle upon a particular subject, which had then been circulated for additional comments, the results edited, and then launched upon the public (often without the express consent of the original author), anticipating utility and inviting comment and amendment…His treatises spread a solvent of new ideas in a variety of contexts, but they were particularly successful in husbandry. He publicized the advantages of planting new leguminous crops, experimenting with fertilizers and manures, and using seed drills and new ploughs, and advocated the possibilities of apiculture, rabbit farming, fruit-tree propagation, and silk cultivation (in Virginia). His network included a group of innovative farmers willing to experiment. But his pamphlets should also be read as ideas, models, or patterns as to how the processes of reformation would occur. “–ODNB.

Very good copy. Small rust-hole on one leaf.

Price: $2,500.00

Item ID: 6509