Item ID: 9341 Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns). GARDENS: TEA GARDEN LANTERNS.
Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns).
Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns).
Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns).
Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns).

Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled in manuscript on upper wrapper “Toro, Oyamada Ryojiro,” with 60 black & white brush drawings of toro (stone lanterns).

30 folding leaves. 8vo (273 x 200 mm.), orig. wrappers (wrappers frayed & a little soiled), stitched as issued. [Japan]: late Edo.

Stone lanterns, which originated in China, were first used in Japan to illuminate pathways in Buddhist temples. In late 16th-century Japan, tea ceremonies were often held at night, necessitating the illumination of the stone paths. Accordingly, tea masters such as Takeno Joo, Sen no Rikyu, and Furuta Oribe introduced stone lanterns to the design of tea gardens.

Our manuscript contains 60 fine drawings of stone lanterns of various styles, ranging from highly ornate to very simple examples. Many of them were favored or designed by the great tea masters of the late 16th century and include ancient lanterns formerly used at shrines and temples. Each of the 60 lanterns has descriptive notes with details of the measurements of all the parts of the lantern (these include the jirin, hibukuro, kasa, and tama sections), locations in famous tea gardens or temples, and motifs employed. Many of the lanterns’ incised inscriptions have been transcribed.

Most interestingly, we learn from the notes which of the illustrated lanterns were favored by the great tea masters, including Oribe, Enshu Korbori, Takeno, Rikyu, Oda Yurakusai (the younger brother of Oda Nobunaga, the warrior), Matsuo Soji, Kanamori Sowa, Sen no Soeki, and Murata Juko.

With the seal, at beginning and end, of Muramatsu Shiko (1874-1974), historian and scholar of Chinese poetry.

Very good condition. There is some mostly marginal dampstaining here and there, and the final leaf is a little soiled.

Price: $2,500.00

Item ID: 9341