Qian Menggu ji shi ben mo [Early Chronicle of the Mongols].

Printed by lithograph. 39; 38 folding leaves. Two vols. Small 8vo, orig. wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, orig. stitching. Shanghai: Chun ji, 1905.

[with]:

—. Hou Mengguji shi ben mo [Later Chronicle of the Mongols]. Printed by lithograph. 39; 54 folding leaves. Two vols. Small 8vo, orig. wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, orig. stitching. Shanghai: Chun ji, 1905.

First edition of this scarce history of the Mongols; it is considered to be one of the best works on the subject of its time. It is written in the jishi benmo lei style of history, in which historical events are reported in an annalistic style, but in a coherent way so that integral themes can be understood from their beginnings to the very end.

Han Shanzheng (n.d.), from Jiangsu in the lower Yangzi region, had earlier (1897) edited a collection of medical texts. His books on Mongol history followed a series of works on this subject published from the 18th century, when the Mongols became firmly integrated into the Qing imperium. In the late 19th century, this brand of scholarship was complemented by historical materials translated into Chinese from Western languages, notably in Hong Jun’s (1839-93) Yuan shi yiwen zhengbu [Verified Additions from Translated Texts on Yuan History]. In the last years of Qing rule, Mongol history thus started to move out of the framework of Chinese dynastic historiography, which conceptualized the Yuan as primarily within the framework of the history of Chinese empires.

Han’s Menggu ji shi ben mo, in two parts, was one of the first publications of Qing scholarship where this trend is clearly evident. First, Han made use of Hong’s sources (and perhaps other material that is not in Hong’s collection as we have it today), and then added his own commentary. Second, Han did not write a book about the Yuan dynasty but about the Mongols as a people; his history extended back far before the founding of the Yuan and continued long past its fall. In both these regards, Han anticipated later historiography on the Mongols, such as Tu Ji’s famous Mengwuer shiji [Historical Records on the Mongols], published in installments beginning in 1911 and then in a posthumous edition in 1934.

❧ Heilong, “Menggu jishi benmo jiqi jiazhi shuping” [“Complete Annals of the Mongols and an Appraisal of their Values”] in Guji zhengli yanjiu xuekan, no. 6 (2016), pp. 7-13. “Bibliographical Essays,” in The Cambridge History of China, Volume 6: Alien Regimes and Border States, 907-1368, edited by Herbert Franke & Denis Twitchett (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp. 665-726. Our description is largely dependent on the researches of Prof. Marten Soderblom Saarela of the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taiwan.

Fine set, preserved in a hantao.

Price: $4,750.00

Item ID: 7824

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