SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion]. SHINKYU BASSUI.
SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion].
SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion].
SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion].
SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

Acupuncture & Moxibustion;
“Impressive”

SHINKYU BASSUI. [Essentials of Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

Woodcut illus. in text (some full-page). 117 folding leaves. Five parts in two vols. 8vo, orig. wrappers (wrappers somewhat tired & rubbed, minor dampstaining in upper outer margins on Vol. II), orig. block-printed title labels on upper cover (label on Vol. I largely perished), new stitching. From the colophon: Kyoto: Honya Kichizaemon; Preface dated 1674.

First edition of this very rare book on acupuncture and moxibustion, the taking of the pulse, and traditional Chinese medicine; it was one of the three most influential works on these subjects of the Edo period. “Shinkyui bassui, by an unknown author or editor, published complete in five volumes in 1685 [Mestler is referring to the 2nd edition of the present work]. This treatise refers to an earlier Chinese work, unnamed, but probably meaning the Rei-su (or Ling-shu), traditionally ascribed to the famous Chinese physician-emperor, Ko-Tei (or Hwang Ti). The detail available in Shinkyu bassui, especially regarding descriptions and instructions for use, is impressive — no less than 22 sections consider the following aspects of moxa and acupuncture: theory; relationship to the pulse; stomach; other internal organs; treatment (which was differentiated by sex); the ‘philosophy’ of acupuncture; cautions in the use of acupuncture and moxa; the preparation and use of moxa cones; how to remove needles (including a separate section on needles which are broken off in the skin); how to twist the needle; how to hit the needle (with a mallet); how to use the needle with a tube; the use of needles (with a separate section on their use in the treatment of boils); on the names of spots (not the ‘right spots’) where — with extreme caution — acupuncture and moxa can be used (regarded as ‘secret’ spots, not for the use of beginners in the art); how to measure for location of sites to apply treatment; on needles in general; on names and lengths of bones; and, finally, on interrelations among nerves.”–Mestler, A Galaxy of Old Japanese Medical Books…Part II. Acupuncture and Moxibustion…, p. 476.

Very good copy.

Price: $9,500.00

Item ID: 7424

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