Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting]. Gento TAKASHI, or Hoyoku, Hoyoku or KOSHI.
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].
Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].

“Epoch-Making”

Honetsugi ryoji chohoki [Treasures of Treating Bonesetting].

Many fine woodcuts, including double-page, single-page, & text illus. 54; 64 (plus one leaf in duplicate); 57 folding leaves. Three vols. Oblong 8vo, orig. patterned blue wrappers (wrappers a little worn), manuscript title labels on upper covers, new stitching. Kyoto & Osaka: Fushimiya Toemon et al., 1746.

First edition and very rare; there is no copy of this edition in WorldCat. “In early 18th-century Japan, there emerged the new discipline of bonesetting (honetsugi) or bone adjustment (seikotsu), corresponding roughly to present-day osteopathy. Traditional physicians dealing with ‘internal medicine’ (hondo) could not do much with anatomy; however, for bonesetters, knowledge about bones, joints, vertebrae, and tendons was essential for a successful practice. The framework and basic treatment methods were developed by Koshi Hoyoku in [the present work]…Koshi devoted a large part of his epoch-making book to anatomical details. Some of his illustrations refer to traditional Chinese writings, while others, especially those that show single bones or areas with joints, are unique and obviously based on protracted observations. In a paragraph on the ribs and spine, he recommends observing skeletons dumped in the fields and mountains, and describes the dispersion of the spine over the years. Koshi did not perform dissections, but he deconstructed skeletons to find out more about their structure, particularly what he called the interlinking of the vertebrae…

“Koshi’s medicine was deeply rooted in Chinese traditions. He refers to 17 classical works, but, as he points out explicitly, in addition to this ‘old wisdom’ (koken), bonesetters should also familiarize themselves with the surgical therapies of the ‘Red-heads’ and ‘Southern Barbarians,’ that is, Europeans. Koshi’s illustrations were significantly better than anything in previous Chinese and Japanese medical publications. Stimulated by his pioneering research, Japanese osteopathic medicine began to be reshaped by the combination of indigenous traditions with Western elements, while emphasizing the importance of observation. Considering the impact of Koshi’s book, it is clear that by the mid-18th century, there were a considerable number of medical professionals engaged in observing corpses at execution places and in the fields.”–Wolfgang Michel-Zaitsu, “Exploring the ‘Inner Landscapes’: the Kaitai shinsho (1774) and its Prehistory” in Yonsei Journal of Medical History, Vol. 21, No. 2 (Dec. 2018), pp. 15-16.

The frontispiece depicts the author examining a scroll, with many books and other scrolls next to him. The third volume contains many pharmaceutical recipes.

A very good set, preserved in a chitsu. The first page of the third volume has some ink splatters but is entirely legible. Minor worming in Vol. II. A second edition was published in 1810.

Price: $5,500.00

Item ID: 7351

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