Le Tresor, les Corps saints, les Tombeaux, et les Raretez qui se voyent dans l’Eglise Royale de S. Denys en France. Avec des Remarques curieuses. BASILICA OF ST. DENIS.
Le Tresor, les Corps saints, les Tombeaux, et les Raretez qui se voyent dans l’Eglise Royale de S. Denys en France. Avec des Remarques curieuses.

Le Tresor, les Corps saints, les Tombeaux, et les Raretez qui se voyent dans l’Eglise Royale de S. Denys en France. Avec des Remarques curieuses.

Woodcut royal coat-of-arms on title & three woodcut floor plans. 51, [1] pp. Small 8vo (155 x 102 mm.), 18th-cent. paste-paper boards (spine a little rubbed), red calf lettering-piece on spine, spine gilt, shelf mark at tail of spine. Paris: J. Chardon, 1715.

[bound with]:

(AMSTERDAM). [Drop-title]: Description de l’Hotel de ville d’Amsterdam, avec les Explications de tous les Emblemes, Figures, Tableaux, Statues &c. qui se trouvent au-dehors, & au-dedans de ce Batiment. Four finely engraved folding plates. 108 pp. Small 8vo. N.p.: n.d.

I. A valuable description of the church of St. Denis, its relics, and the crypt, which contains the tombs of French royalty. This is an early augmented edition with meticulous details on the architecture and interior of this iconic building. In 1795, revolutionaries sacked the church, and many of its contents were destroyed or disappeared, making this an important listing of the treasures once found there.

Divided into four chapters, this guide proceeds from room to room noting important architectural features as well as providing an inventory of the artworks and relics within. The woodcut floor plans, one of which is full-page, shows the final resting places of France’s royalty.

II. A nicely illustrated French guide to Amsterdam’s famed city hall, a notable example of Dutch Classicism. The building was designed by Jacob van Campen and completed in 1655. It is recognized as his “main work and certainly his masterpiece…van Campen designed both the building and the decoration. The designs were executed in marble by the sculptor Artus Quellien, his principal assistant Rombout Verhulst, and other skilled artists. The size of the building — the street was enlarged to create this city center — and the rich decorations all express the city’s glory; the building was simultaneously a monument of the Peace of Munster after eighty years of war with Spain…”–Macmillan Encyclopedia of Architects, vol. 4, pp. 271-72.

The present work consists of lengthy descriptions of the city hall’s exterior and interior. It begins with a history of previous city halls, and the process of finding an architect to design a new one to embody the city’s importance. The first folding plate is a view of the old city hall structure, the remaining three depict the new building in all its glory, with the fourth being a floor plan showing van Campen’s symmetrical design. The third illustration was executed by “A. de Putter,” a Dutch engraver active in Amsterdam in the first half of the 18th century who seems to have rendered the city hall on a number of occasions.

Two uncommon guides to buildings of great symbolic importance. With the engraved bookplate of Ludwig Friedrich, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, noting that this book was part of the 16,000-volume library purchased from chancellor Carl Gerhardt von Ketelhodt (1738-1814) in 1804 (see CERL Thesaurus).

❧ Benezit Dictionary of Artists, Vol. 11, p. 484 (A. de Putter).

Price: $1,250.00

Item ID: 7177