Euclidis Elementorum Libri XV. Accessit XVI. de Solidorum Regularium comparatione. Omnes perspicuis Demonstrationibus, accuratisque Scholiis illustrati. Auctore Christophoro Clavio…. EUCLID.
Euclidis Elementorum Libri XV. Accessit XVI. de Solidorum Regularium comparatione. Omnes perspicuis Demonstrationibus, accuratisque Scholiis illustrati. Auctore Christophoro Clavio…

“The Euclid of the Sixteenth Century”

Euclidis Elementorum Libri XV. Accessit XVI. de Solidorum Regularium comparatione. Omnes perspicuis Demonstrationibus, accuratisque Scholiis illustrati. Auctore Christophoro Clavio…

Titles within architectural woodcut borders & numerous woodcuts in the text. 20 p.l., 331, [1] leaves, one blank leaf; 300 leaves. Two vols. in one. Thick 8vo, cont. blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards, upper cover dated in blind “1580,” remains of catches. Rome: V. Accolti, 1574.

First edition of Clavius’s main work, his rare and influential edition of Euclid; ours is a fine and handsome copy in a contemporary south German or Swiss blind-stamped and panelled pigskin binding over wooden boards. Clavius (1538-1612), was called by his contemporaries “the Euclid of the sixteenth century.”

“In 1574 a new departure in the matter of format was taken. A Latin edition in two octavo volumes with rather diminutive diagrams was printed at Rome by Vincenzo Accolti. The [editor] was Christophorus Clavius (Schlüssel) of Bamberg, of the Society of Jesus, a mathematician who gave the Gregorian Calendar of New Style its present form and made all the calculations necessary for its verification. It contains the fifteen books with very full scholia, and the addition of a sixteenth, De solidorum regularium comparatione. It was reprinted at Rome in 1589 in the same form, and in folio at Cologne in 1591.”–Thomas-Stanford, p. 11.

[Clavius’s] “Elements, which is not a translation, contains a vast quantity of notes collected from previous commentators and editors, as well as some good criticisms and elucidations of his own. Among other things, Clavius made a new attempt at proving ‘the postulate of the parallels.’…In a scholion, to the twelfth proposition of the ninth book of Euclid, Clavius objects to Cardanus’ claim to originality in employing a method that derives a proposition by assuming the contradictory of the proposition to be proved. According to Clavius, Cardanus was anticipated in this method by Euclid and by Theodosius of Bithynia in the twelfth proposition of the first book of his Sphaericorum.”–D.S.B., III, p. 311.

Minor browning and discoloration to the binding but a fine and large copy; just the way it should appear.

❧Thomas-Stanford 19.

Price: $9,500.00

Item ID: 5968

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