...Opuscula. LXXXXII. Index Moralium omnium, & eorum quae in ipsis tractantur, habetur hoc quaternione. Numerus autem Arithmeticus remittit lectorem ad semipaginam, ubi tractantur singula. Edited by Demetrius Ducas, assisted by Erasmus & Girolamo Aleandro. PLUTARCH.
...Opuscula. LXXXXII. Index Moralium omnium, & eorum quae in ipsis tractantur, habetur hoc quaternione. Numerus autem Arithmeticus remittit lectorem ad semipaginam, ubi tractantur singula. Edited by Demetrius Ducas, assisted by Erasmus & Girolamo Aleandro.

A Splendid Copy with a Fine Humanist Provenance;

Thick Paper Copy

...Opuscula. LXXXXII. Index Moralium omnium, & eorum quae in ipsis tractantur, habetur hoc quaternione. Numerus autem Arithmeticus remittit lectorem ad semipaginam, ubi tractantur singula. Edited by Demetrius Ducas, assisted by Erasmus & Girolamo Aleandro.

Large Aldine device on title. Printed in Greek throughout. 8 p.l., 1050 pp., one leaf with anchor device. Thick small folio (275 x 177 mm.), cont. blind-stamped panelled pigskin over bevelled wooden boards (binding a little stained & marked), three (of four) catches, one (of two) clasps. Venice: [Aldine Press, 1509].

Editio princeps, a remarkably fine and fresh copy printed on what appears to be thick paper.

This is the only copy we know of with an important humanistic provenance to appear on the market for many, many years. This splendid volume belonged to Lodovicus Carinus (ca. 1496-d. 1569), humanist, medical doctor, educator, and friend of Erasmus at Basel. Carinus, who has written on the title-page “Sum Carini,” was very much part of the circle of Erasmus and the Froben press for many years. Erasmus commended him as an exemplary young scholar and put him as an actor in the Colloquia, where he appears under his real name. A rupture occurred between the two in 1528 and Erasmus later referred to Carinus as the young viper he had carried in his bosom. By 1539, Carinus became close to the Fugger family, tutoring, studying medicine, and travelling with Ulrich and Hans Fugger to Paris, Padua, and Bologna. Treated generously by the Fugger family, Carinus became wealthy. He gave a great deal of support to scholarly projects, securing manuscripts in the possession of the Fugger family and subsidizing the printing of costly books. When he died at Basel, Carinus “left a library which was purchased by a member of the Fugger family for six hundred florins.”–Bietenholz, ed., Contemporaries of Erasmus. A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation, Vol. I, p. 268.

The Moralia contains much on medicine, health, science, and physics and it is clear why this text would have appealed to Carinus who practiced medicine in his later years in Basel.

This copy, having been acquired by the Fuggers in 1569 upon the death of Carinus, was presented by Count Fugger of Mickhausen to St. Salvator, the Jesuit college at Augsburg, probably at the time of the college’s foundation in 1582. This college was founded and supported by the Fugger family.

“The 1509 edition of Plutarch was the product of many years’ work (Aldus complains in the preface that the work on the Moralia was very difficult and comments that he had been nearly forced to abandon the project many times). The work was edited by Demetrius Ducas, a Cretan scholar who was a participant in Aldus’s academy. Ducas was assisted by Erasmus as well as Girolamo Aleandro…the press copy of much of the Aldine edition of Plutarch has been discovered at the Ambrosian Library in Milan; its state is a case study in how early printers treated these manuscripts. Rather than make a new, corrected, and edited copy of the text for the typesetters, Ducas and others simply wrote changes onto the original thirteenth-century manuscript itself. Parts of the manuscript contain the page markings of the Aldine text, ensuring that the type for a given page ended and started at the correct point. Some of the pages are marked stampato (‘printed’), indicating that those sections had already been printed from another source and there was no need to go over them again. There is evidence from this manuscript that even as manuscript pages were being handed to the typesetters the editing of the work was still in process. Although the direction of the chain lines in the paper implies that this is a quarto book, that is, each piece of paper was printed in four sections and then folded to form four leaves, Renouard notes that the size of the final leaves is so large that if this had been the procedure, Aldus would have needed a much larger press than he is known to have had. Therefore, Renouard posits that he cut the sheets in two and printed them as folios, each piece being printed in two sections and then folded into two leaves and sewn together to form the book.”–In Aedibus Aldi. The Legacy of Aldus Manutius and his Press (Brigham Young University, Provo, 1995), 18. Renouard, 55, no. 1.

A very fine and fresh copy. Early signature “Sum Carini” on title and ownership inscription of the Jesuit College at Augsburg at head of title “Collegii Soc. Jesu Augusb. 1719. Ex dono Illmi: h. Comitis Fuggeri de Mickhausen.” Light dampstaining to first 12 leaves in upper margin and final 12 leaves in outer margin.

Price: $100,000.00

Item ID: 5445

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