Elementorum Geometricorum. Lib. XV. Cum Expositione Theonis in Priores XIII à Bartholomaeo Veneto Latinitate donata, Campani in omnes, & Hypsiclis Alexandrini in duos postremos. His adjecta sunt Phaenomena, Catoptrica & Optica, deinde Protheoria Marini & Data, postremum vero, Opusculum De Levi & Ponderoso, hactenus non visum, eiusdem autoris.
Elementorum Geometricorum. Lib. XV. Cum Expositione Theonis in Priores XIII à Bartholomaeo Veneto Latinitate donata, Campani in omnes, & Hypsiclis Alexandrini in duos postremos. His adjecta sunt Phaenomena, Catoptrica & Optica, deinde Protheoria Marini & Data, postremum vero, Opusculum De Levi & Ponderoso, hactenus non visum, eiusdem autoris.

The Important First Basel Latin Edition;

The Fine Oettingen-Wallerstein Copy

Elementorum Geometricorum. Lib. XV. Cum Expositione Theonis in Priores XIII à Bartholomaeo Veneto Latinitate donata, Campani in omnes, & Hypsiclis Alexandrini in duos postremos. His adjecta sunt Phaenomena, Catoptrica & Optica, deinde Protheoria Marini & Data, postremum vero, Opusculum De Levi & Ponderoso, hactenus non visum, eiusdem autoris.

Woodcut printer’s device on title & another on verso of last leaf. Many woodcut diagrams throughout and numerous fine & large woodcut initials. 4 p.l., 587, [1] pp. Folio, cont. blind-stamped panelled pigskin over beveled wooden boards (minor worming at beginning, touching some letters), orig. clasps (one defective) and catches, 19th-cent. morocco lettering pieces on spine. Basel: J. Herwagen, 1537.

First Basel edition; this is the first complete assemblage of the Euclidean texts, with printings of both Campanus of Navara’s and Bartolomeo Zamberti’s versions. It also contains the new Preface by Philipp Melanchthon which in many copies, according to Thomas-Stanford, was removed by the censor. This Herwagen edition contains all the major Euclidean texts: the Elements, Phaenomena, Catoptrica, Data, and the Opusculum de Levi & Ponderoso, which appears here for the first time.

The version of Books I-XV of the Elements by Campanus of Navara, (d. 1296) was the one generally used in the later Middle Ages and was employed in the first edition of 1482. It was frequently reprinted (at least 14 times in the 15th and 16th centuries).

Our edition also contains the version of Bartolomeo Zamberti (b. ca. 1473). “Zamberti was most conscious of the advantages he believed to accrue from his working from a Greek text. This enabled him, he claimed, to add things hitherto missing and properly to arrange and prove again much found in the version of Campanus.”–D.S.B., IV, p. 448.

Also included is the first printing of the Opusculum de Levi & Ponderoso. “No work by Euclid on mechanics is extant in Greek, nor is he credited with any mechanical works by ancient writers. According to Arabic sources, however, he wrote a Book on the Heavy and the Light, and when Hervagius was about to publish his 1537 edition there was brought to him a mutilated fragment, De levi et ponderoso, which he included as one of Euclid’s works…It is the most precise exposition that we possess of the Aristotelian dynamics of freely moving bodies.”–D.S.B., IV, p. 431. “Applies geometric methods of proof to theorems relative to freely falling bodies. Possibly a fragment of the original text. Authenticity questioned, but inconclusively. A translation presumably based upon an Arabic version.”–Stillwell, The Awakening Interest in Science during the First Century of Printing 1450-1550, 750.

A fine copy from the Oettingen-Wallerstein library with their stamp on title-page. Modern bookplates of H. Staigmüller and David L. DiLaura.

❧ Thomas-Stanford 9.

Price: $15,000.00

Item ID: 3707

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